Essential Burgundy from past weeks

Françine Picard, Au pied du Mont-Chauve/Maison Michel Picard, Chassagne-Montrachet

Françine Picard, Au pied du Mont-Chauve/Maison Michel Picard, Chassagne-Montrachet

When it comes to Burgundian wine which is your most memorable experience?
– I am not a person of one wine but many. Moreover, my best experience is an every day experience, meaning an every day shared passion and hard work. Then come the tasting and time to spned some relaxing time with friends or family or customers and let us enjoy. The what I will enjoy today will be different from the one I will taste tomorrow, as my mood will change. But the richness of Burgundy wines, its diversity, that is my most memorable experience.

In your opinion which is the most overlooked part of Burgundy?
– We produce some great wines in Côte Chalonnaise, especially whites according to me. They can be very delicate and flavoured, not too rich, but with nice complexity. On top of it, this area of Burgundy has one of the nicest landscapes in Burgundy. Prices are not very high, because their grades are never as good as for the Côte de Beaune and Côte de Nuits wines. Great price/quality ratio.

Speaking of food, what is not to missed when visiting Burgundy?
– Les œufs en meurette, sauce au vin blanc and les gougères, easy but so good.

Philippe Bardet, Maison Louis Max, Nuits-Saint-Georges

Philippe Bardet, Maison Louis Max, Nuits-Saint-Georges

When it comes to Burgundian wine which is your most memorable experience?
– With Burgundian wines, in the last two decades we have been spoilt by outstanding vintages. Clos de Tart 1997 grand cru, a difficult vintage, was certainly one of the best wine drunk recently. All the true character of still a young wine but with authentic matured Burgundy flavours. It was for the 80th birthday of my parents!

In your opinion which is the most overlooked part of Burgundy?
– Most of the wines from the Côte Chalonnaise, especially Mercurey. Soils, altitude, sun orientation have the same great profile as the Côte de Beaune or the Côte de Nuits and can produce great bottles. A good number of winegrowers are now working hard to produce better quality wines with good fruit driven style but seriously enough to age. And still at affordable prices!

Speaking of food, what is not to missed when visiting Burgundy?
– Don't miss the chickens… coming from the Bresse area nearby, which is an AOC. The most simple way is to cook it on the grill, the best way is to cook it in a white wine sauce, or more traditionally with fresh daily cream. Serve it with local seasonal mushrooms such as morels, ceps or boletus… with a good bottle of Meursault.

Bastien Fargues, Domaine Fargues, Bligny-lès-Beaune

Bastien Fargues, Domaine Fargues, Bligny-lès-Beaune

When it comes to Burgundian wine which is your most memorable experience?
– It was at a restaurant when I tasted a red Blagny premier cru for the first time. An appellation unknown to me and it was love at first sight. A great discovery, there was lots of finesse on the nose and a beautiful mix of red and black fruits. A quite structured wine, with a very smooth finish. Very well-balanced, a real treat!

In your opinion which is the most overlooked part of Burgundy?
– Very good question! Many appellations in Burgundy deserve better recognition! But if I had to pick one – I speak from my own experience since we have it at the domaine – I would say Beaune. Both the premier crus and the village appellation. People often talk about the wines around Beaune: Pommard, Volnay, Meursault. They are very well-known, the appellation Beaune much less so. The town of Beaune is famous, but its wines are not as famous. Yet there are some very good wines; fruity, with soft tannins. Pleasant twines, wines that challenge men and seduce women! The Beaune winegrowers are trying to promote this appellation. Every year in January, at the Saint Vincent in Beaune, there is a very nice event at the Hospices de Beaune. It is open to all. Every year Burgundy lovers, and even connoisseurs, aredelighted to discover or rediscover this appellation!

Speaking of food, what is not to missed when visiting Burgundy?
– When it comes to gastronomy Burgundy has many things to offer. The jambon persillé the oeufs en meurette are my personal favourites. These dishes are fabulous and at Domaine Fargues tradition dictates that we celebrate each harvest, each bottling and every step of the vinification with jambon persillé and a good white wine!

Vincent Ledy, Domaine Vincent Ledy, Nuits-Saint-Georges.

Vincent Ledy, Domaine Vincent Ledy, Nuits-Saint-Georges

When it comes to Burgundian wine which is your most memorable experience?
– A 2003 Chambolle-Musigny from Domaine Arlaud in Morey-Saint-Denis. A wine of great finesse, from a heavy vintage. It's wines like this we want more of.

In your opinion which is the most overlooked part of Burgundy?
– I will not be objective, because I have it in my portfolio, but without hesitation I would say the Hautes-Côtes de Nuits and the Hautes-Côtes de Beaune. These appellations do not have a very good image. But it is a vast appellation and there are parcels that are excellent in terms of exposition and terroir.
– This goes for all of Burgundy's appellations. I think the consumers should buy the terroir instead of the label. Savvy consumers should even keep in mind which parcels inside the appellations the grapes come from. There is good and less good all over Burgundy.
– I created my domaine from scratch in 2007 and my philosophy when it comes to buying land is that it is important where inside the appellation the parcel is located. Last year I turned down an offer to buy some Corton-Charlemagne. I had the investors, but I felt the parcel didn't do the appellation justice. I prefer to have only really good parcels in my portfolio.

Speaking of food, what is not to missed when visiting Burgundy?
– It not an easy question, but would probably say all the cheeses of the region.

Thibault Morey, Domaine Morey-Coffinet, Chassagne-Montrachet

Thibault Morey, Domaine Morey-Coffinet, Chassagne-Montrachet

When it comes to Burgundian wine which is your most memorable experience?
– A 2000 Montrachet from Olivier Leflaive. I had it in 2010 at a very nice meal with friends. It seemed to be at its peak (according to my taste). 2000 is a vintage I particularly like and the style of Olivier Leflaive's wines has always appealed to me. What I felt when drinking this "pearl" is impossible to describe. A Grand Bourgogne is simply beyond words.

In your opinion which is the most overlooked part of Burgundy?
– Auxey-Duresses would without a doubt deserve a bit more attention from media and Burgundy lovers. The whites from Maranges also surprises me more and more, particularly the premier cru La Fussière made by Domaine Bachelet-Monnot.

Speaking of food, what is not to missed when visiting Burgundy?
– The snails!! With a Chablis Fourchaumes for example. Just talking about them makes me want to have some to eat.

Clémence Dubrulle, Domaine de la Folie, Chagny

Clémence Dubrulle, Domaine de la Folie, Chagny

When it comes to Burgundian wine which is your most memorable experience?
– It was of course an experience with the family. In 1994, when my grandfather Etienne Noel-Bouton passed away, we found three bottles of white Rully premier cru Clos St Jacques, which is a monopole of Domaine de la Folie. The first two bottles were past their best, but the third… it was mind-blowing!!! An extraordinary perfume of honey and acacia flowers preserved despite the years. It was a discovery that looked like a nod from the past, a hand passing on the torch to my father Jérôme Noel-Bouton, and the generations to come at Domaine de la Folie.

In your opinion which is the most overlooked part of Burgundy?
– Definitely the Côte Chalonnaise: Rully, Mercurey, Givry, Montagny… It produces sublime wines, with great finesse from a terroir both diverse and subtle, but it doesn't have the same reputation as its neighbours. The price difference is an injustice, but the price/quality ratio also becomes a strong point.

Speaking of food, what is not to missed when visiting Burgundy?
– Don't miss the escargots de Bourgogne au beurre persillé, the jambon persillé, the oeufs en meurette, the coq au vin, the boeuf Bourguignon, the crawfish, the Pochouse or a digestif like an old Eau de Vie de Marc with a cassissine… and this is just a sample of the gastronomic wealth of our beautiful region. Like they say in the song: "et je suis fière d'être Bourguignon"! (I'm proud to be Burgundian).

Frédéric J. Drouhin, Maison Joseph Drouhin, Beaune

Frédéric J. Drouhin, Maison Joseph Drouhin, Beaune

When it comes to Burgundian wine which is your most memorable experience?
– Recently we had a family gathering and on that occasion my father poured a bottle of Musigny 1856. The oldest bottle in his cellar. That bottle was the 1st vintage produced by my great grand father Joseph Drouhin and probably the only one left in the world. The wine was like an old lady but with still a lot of charm. The nose was like a bouquet of dried roses and the mouth was delicate, balanced. Nobody talked. There was a religious silence for a couple of minutes. It was highly emotional.

In your opinion which is the most overlooked part of Burgundy?
– I believe the Chablis Premier Cru and the Chablis Grand Cru are still overlooked as most of the consumers focus only on the straight Chablis. This great region of Burgundy has a unique terroir and the Grand Cru wines stand the comparison with the best whites of Côte d'Or.

Speaking of food, what is not to missed when visiting Burgundy?
– I am lucky to live in a great region where we can have five to six courses meal with products coming only from Burgundy. There are things we cook here that are not available in any places in the world which I personally recommend to the visitors coming here for the first time:
Gougères (I like them also stuffed with scrambled eggs and truffles), jambon persillé, colvert duck, and of course a full plate of cheeses with one of my favorite the Epoisses.
I remember the personal experience when I was student in the USA in the early 90's. I was desperate to find some French cheeses and one day walking into a store in New-York I smelled an unmistakable odor: Epoisses. I looked a the shelf where I saw an Epoisses clearly over mature. I ordered it and it seems the vendor was very happy to get rid of it.

François de Nicolay, Domaine Chandon de Briailles, Savigny-lès-Beaune

François de Nicolay, Domaine Chandon de Briailles, Savigny-lès-Beaune

When it comes to Burgundian wine which is your most memorable experience?
– Something I shall remember for long is the 1999 harvest. I had never seen such wonderful pinot noir grapes; dark, healthy, solid. The wines that came out this year are fantastic, very well balanced, ripe and so elegant. Wines from this vintage are 100% whole clusters.
Two great wines in my life: 1959 Corton Les Bressandes from our own domaine, tasted at the domaine in 2003. And the greatest white was this tremendous 1982 Batard-Montrachet from Pierre Morey at the Bannée de Meursault in 2002.

In your opinion which is the most overlooked part of Burgundy?
– A region that would deserve more attention is the northern part of the Beaujolais with its marvellous crus. I'm talking about Moulin à Vent, Fleurie and the others… I know it's a broad definition of Burgundy, but it's still Burgundy. The wines are generous, people are very friendly and the landscape is beautiful. At the moment, these wines are the very best quality/price ratio. I remember a 1980 Moulin à Vent tasted with Frédéric Ménager at la Ruchotte two years ago that was so delicate and aromatic, you'd believe it was a pinot noir from the Côte d'Or.

Speaking of food, what is not to missed when visiting Burgundy?
– Something to try: Colvert duck (wild), cooked rosé with a blood and wine sauce, and a 1995 Corton, Les Maréchaudes. A brilliant match! I also particularly like fresh frogs legs with a good Pouilly-Fuissé, Clos de la Roche from Saumaize-Michelin. And the very best way to enjoy this is on the banks of the Saône.

Christine Drouhin, Domaine Drouhin-Laroze, Gevrey-Chambertin

Christine Drouhin, Domaine Drouhin-Laroze, Gevrey-Chambertin

When it comes to Burgundian wine which is your most memorable experience?
– My most memorable experience was the day when I tasted the 1996 Musigny from Domaine Drouhin-Laroze for the first time… Why? We have owned Musigny vines since 1996, when we had the exceptional opportunity to buy this so famous grand cru. So this special day was my birthday a few years ago and Philippe, my husband, decided to open a bottle of this appellation (it was the first time we tried Musigny), and this moment was fantastic!!!!

In your opinion which is the most overlooked part of Burgundy?
– For me the most overlooked part of Burgundy is the Ouche's valley (the Ouche is a small river). I find it interesting and it is so nice during the summer.

Speaking of food, what is not to missed when visiting Burgundy?
– The most interesting speciality is the gougères, pastry with cheese, which is so nice with tastings. When I receive customers I offer this homemade speciality and people like that a lot.

Jacques Bavard, Domaine des Closeaux, Puligny-Montrachet

Jacques Bavard, Domaine des Closeaux, Puligny-Montrachet

When it comes to Burgundian wine which is your most memorable experience?
– It's more than a wine, it's the moments with friends sharing very good wines. Among others there is a 1991 Chassagne-Montrachet, Clos St Jean, by Domaine Michel Niellon – on the hill of Puligny-Montrachet, with an old Comté cheese at the end of a sunny day.

In your opinion which is the most overlooked part of Burgundy?
– The excellence of the appellations that is not found in the bottles.

Speaking of food, what is not to missed when visiting Burgundy?

– I would say the Oeufs en Meurette.

Antoine Jaboulet-Vercherre, Domaine de Mac Mahon, Auxey-Duresses

Antoine Jaboulet-Vercherre, Domaine de Mac Mahon, Auxey-Duresses

When it comes to Burgundian wine which is your most memorable experience?

– My most memorable experience is a Pommard by Hubert de Montille from 1990.

In your opinion which is the most overlooked part of Burgundy?

– I think Auxey-Duresses, Saint Aubin and Pernand-Vergelesses deserve better recognition. These appellations are overshadowed by Corton-Charlemagne, Meursault, Puligny-Montrachet and Chassagne-Montrachet.

Speaking of food, what is not to missed when visiting Burgundy?

– The Oeufs en Meurette.

Antoine Olivier, Domaine Olivier, Santenay

Antoine Olivier, Domaine Olivier, Santenay

When it comes to Burgundian wine which is your most memorable experience?
– My memories of great wines in Burgundy are innumerable, some very old Côte de Nuits wines and lots of great whites from Chassagne-Montrachet and Puligny-Montrachet. I am very lucky to be born right next to these! My last great tasting took place in February 2011 at Domaine Coche-Dury Meursault, for me he is the high priest of white Burgundy. The whole range of white the 2008's, and especially some old Meursault (Perrieres and Charmes) were most beautiful. 1982 Meursault Charmes – monumental!

In your opinion which is the most overlooked part of Burgundy
– In terms of wines, all lesser-known appellations of the Côte de Beaune, the Côte Chalonnaise or elsewhere where the soil may not have the quality of the most prestigious appellations in Burgundy, but with the will of many producers to produce the best wines possible the results are often outstanding. As for tourism, Morvan is a part a bit more of untamed wilderness, with fantastic scenery and well-preserved environment, but you must love the forest and solitude...

Speaking of food, what is not to missed when visiting Burgundy?
– Without hesitation, the Oeufs en Meurette. A simple dish; fresh eggs, onions, garlic and a red wine reduction, but like all simple things it requires mastery in order to achieve perfection. It's a dish that illustrates Burgundy – quiet and rural (in the positive sense), but often exceptional.

Benjamin Borgnat, Domaine Borgnat,Escolives-Sainte-Camille

Benjamin Borgnat, Domaine Borgnat, Escolives-Sainte-Camille

When it comes to Burgundian wine which is your most memorable experience?
– Personally, the most memorable experience was my first vintage, in 1999. I was just back from wine school in Beaune, but I was lacking in experience, and I felt some pressure. I had the feeling the time had come to see if I could become a winemaker here in my native Burgundy. Despite old-fashioned equipment and lack of organisation, but thanks to the help of friends and family, I made made my first wines after weeks of working night and day.

– Today my wife Eglantine takes care of the wine making, while I take care of the grapes. There has been improvements every year and more than ten years later we are proud to make a wine that more and more resembles us.

In your opinion which is the most overlooked part of Burgundy
– Certainly the Auxerrois wine growing area in nothern Burgundy. Especially the Coulanges region with its orchards, its vineyards, hilly landscape, its sincere welcoming, its typical cooking, its historical sites…

Speaking of food, what is not to missed when visiting Burgundy?
– For me Burgundian food extends from the fussy cuisine to the friendly moments around something as simple as tasty; Gougères with a glass of fruity Bourgogne Coulanges would be my recommendation… and it can be followed by a gastronomic menu!

Sébastien Dampt, Domaine Sébastien Dampt, Milly

Sébastien Dampt, Domaine Sébastien Dampt, Milly

When it comes to Burgundian wine which is your most memorable experience?
– Every year on New Year's Day we have a family dinner and my grand father Jean Defaix opens a very old bottle from his cellar. We started with the 1944 Chablis premier cru, but my most memorable experience is a 1947 Chablis premier cru Côte de Léchet. Fantastic flavours: undergrowth, honey and a minerality that you always find in a Cote de Léchet. Incredible freshness. 1947 was a vintage of exceptional maturity, but this wine had a good acidity. That's why I can say to our customers that Chablis has a very good ageing potential!

In your opinion which is the most overlooked part of Burgundy?
– I'd say Irancy, without a doubt. This vignoble is exceptional, it's the part of Yonne which gives the best expression of the pinot noir. The wines are very pleasant and for some vintages like 2003 or 2005 I'm sure that in a blind tasting you would compare them with some Côte d'Or wines. I recommend the wines of Thierry Richoux in Irancy, the wines are excellent and the man himself is very sympathetic.

Speaking of food, what is not to missed when visiting Burgundy?
– I would recommend two things. The snails, a typical dish from Burgund and a very good companion for chardonnay wines. And the Jambon au Chablis (ham with Chablis sauce), a very typical dish from my part of Burgundy. It is a reduction sauce with wine, shallots etc. One of my favourite dishes.

Jean-Luc Houblin, Domaine Jean-Luc Houblin, Migé

Jean-Luc Houblin, Domaine Jean-Luc Houblin, Migé

When it comes to Burgundian wine which is your most memorable experience?
– 2003, the year of the heatwave. The weather was chaotic climate, drought in June and July and with very high temperatures in August (43°C in Auxerre). As a result we began harvesting for the reds on August 20, whereas in a "normal" year we begin in late September. To get the best alcoholic fermentation temperatures we picked at night, from 3-4AM till noon. This vintage is very different from the others with strong blackcurrant aroma and exceptional concentration.

In your opinion which is the most overlooked part of Burgundy?
– Hardly surprisingly I think it's it's Bourgogne Coulanges la Vineuse. I'm not completely unbiased, but I think it's a fact. The main reason is the small volume available. Only 90 hectares (810 000 bottles per year).

Speaking of food, what is not to missed when visiting Burgundy?
– First, the gougères that go very well with a Bourgogne Aligote or a Crémant de Bourgogne. Then a snail clafouti with a Bourgogne Blanc Coulanges. And of course the most famous dish of Burgundy, the boeuf bourguignon.

David Clark, Domaine David Clark, Morey-Saint-Denis

David Clark, Domaine David Clark, Morey-Saint-Denis

When it comes to Burgundian wine which is your most memorable experience?
– My most memorable wine would be a '92 Volnay 1er Cru, Hospices de Beaune cuvée Général Muteau, drunk about eight years ago, shortly before I moved to Burgundy. I have drunk many "grander" wines, but this bottle exceeded all expectations and reminds me that the company and the occasion are much more important than the label.

In your opinion which is the most overlooked part of Burgundy?
– There are many, but nearest to home I would say Marsannay. Lots of good terroirs and number of young, conscientious producers like Sylvain Pataille and Philippe Huguenot.

Speaking of food, what is not to missed when visiting Burgundy?
– La Ferme de la Ruchotte in Bligny-sur-Ouche. It's miles from anywhere, but the food makes the trip unquestionably worthwhile.

Thibaut Marion, Domaine Seguin-Manuel, Beaune

Thibaut Marion, Domaine Seguin-Manuel, Beaune

When it comes to Burgundian wine which is your most memorable experience?
– In 2005, the year after I took over the Seguin-Manuel winery, I had been invited in London to participate in a tasting of very old rare grand cru Burgundies that I had auctioned through Christie's a few months before! Anthony Hanson and Neal Martin were there among other wine lovers. Most of the wines were showing beautifully. The last bottle of the range, a 1918 Musigny was then opened. Everybody were quiet. There was a religious silence in the air, a mystical concentration. In every participant's glass, the wine was changing minute after minute: fruit, flower petal, spice, undergrowth, incense aromas develop in this perfectly balanced wine. It took several minutes before the spell was broken and a taster dared say a word. In the end, the wine was commented by everybody for a very long time. More than ever, I realised that wine is not a simple beverage but an emotion to share with others...

In your opinion which is the most overlooked part of Burgundy?
– The Savigny-lès-Beaune wines, of course! Not only because it is the cradle of the Seguin-Manuel vineyards, but also because the great diversity of terroirs there produces subtle and individual wines. In the late 19th century-early 20th century, don't forget that the Savigny wines were considered as ultimate burgundies!

Speaking of food, what is not to missed when visiting Burgundy?
– My wife's cooking, but this is an experience for a happy few!

Claude Madelin, Domaine Madelin-Petit, Vaux

Claude Madelin, Domaine Madelin-Petit, Vaux

When it comes to Burgundian wine which is your most memorable experience?
– Thinking about Burgundy one particularly memorable moment comes to mind, a tasting of a 1981 Chablis Grand Cru Les Preuses from Vincent Dauvissat, who has a solid reputation. This Chablis had aged gracefully. What made it so special, was the complexity of its subtle aromas and length on the palate that was one of the best.

In your opinion which is the most overlooked part of Burgundy?
– In Burgundy one can find wonderful terroirs in the regional appellations. The appellation Bourgogne Côtes d'Auxerre is quite large so it is quite heterogeneous. But if you look at it closer, there are the well-exposed slopes above the village of Vaux overlooking the Yonne valley. Here you'll find Kimméridgien with well-drained soil. These vineyards produce wines with character – much minerality and a taste of gentian and vanilla. They are smooth and creamy on the palate, and easy to appreciate.

Speaking of food, what is not to missed when visiting Burgundy?
– When you stay in Burgundy there are numerous specialities, but let's mention a curiosity, the famous tarte à l'époisses – that is if you like the cheese with the same name of course!

Louis Vallet, Domaine Pierre Bourée Fils, Gevrey-Chambertin

Louis Vallet, Domaine Pierre Bourée Fils, Gevrey-Chambertin

When it comes to Burgundian wine which is your most memorable experience?
– It was a vertical tasting put together for a group of English wine lovers. The wine was the grand cru Charmes-Chambertin, from 1970 to 1990. Everybody knew which wine it was, but the vintages were kept secret. To my great surprise the vintage that received the best notes from the majority of the tasters was the 1977, with the following comments: "The most elegant, the most delicate, the most distinguished", all the essential characteristics of a Burgundy wine. It was like the finding of Moses!

In your opinion which is the most overlooked part of Burgundy?
– The hillsides of Gevrey-Chambertin, like in all the villages of the Côte, are separated north-south by a valley. In our case it is the Combe de Lavaux. On the south side are all the grand crus and on the north side are a large chunk of premier crus. Among these you have the Gevrey-Chambertin premier cru Champeaux which is the northernmost of them all. Then there is the Lavaux St-Jacques, the Estournelles, the Clos St-Jacques and the grands and petits Cazetiers, which all seem to end up a bit in the shadow of their illustrious neighbours. Except for the great quality with both finesse and elegance, one has to discover the soils that produce these wines. Only their charm makes a visit worthwhile. Here you'll find parcels completely enclosed by sepia coloured stone walls which can only be reached by foot. You can also take shelter in a cabotte, which will protect you both from the cold and the heat. You'll find them in the vineyards, made sepia coloured stones and it would be better to call them by their real name – une grotte, a cave.

Speaking of food, what is not to missed when visiting Burgundy?
– The majority of the people visiting Burgundy think about tasting wine, which is the common thing to do. Among the lesser-known things is the outstanding speciality from Dijon in Burgundy, the pain d'epice (gingerbread) with its tenderness and pleasant honeyed perfume.

Caroline Lestimé, Domaine Jean-Noël Gagnard, Chassagne-Montrachet

Caroline Lestimé, Domaine Jean-Noël Gagnard, Chassagne-Montrachet

When it comes to Burgundian wine which is your most memorable experience?
– My tasting training began when I was child with champagne and the white wines from our domaine. Later my oenological experiences would continue with the great terroirs of the Côte de Nuits. I cannot avoid mentioning several instead of one, so in no particular order there is a Chambertin Clos de Bèze, a Cros Parentoux and Brûlées from Vosne-Romanée, a La Tâche, some Saint Georges from Nuits... I also remember some wonderful occasions in the cellars of my winegrower friends and memorable vintages such as 1983, 1985, 1989...

In your opinion which is the most overlooked part of Burgundy?
– The wines of the Hautes-Côtes de Beaune are neglected and yet there are some nice discoveries to made there. Chardonnay and pinot noir have replaced aligoté and gamay, the quality is increasing all the time and they are also being helped by the global warming.

Speaking of food, what is not to missed when visiting Burgundy?
– The gougères, the jambon persillé or the cheese Époisses are some of the specialities to be discovered, either at the counter of a café or at a picnic in the vines.

Philippe Garrey, Domaine Philippe Garrey, Saint Martin sous Montaigu

Philippe Garrey, Domaine Philippe Garrey, Saint Martin sous Montaigu

When it comes to Burgundian wine which is your most memorable experience?
– My most memorable was the tasting of a 1964 La Tâche, in 2004. It was tasted blind with friends, and nobody could tell the vintage because this wine was still so young, powerful, balanced and complex with impressive aromas. It was not 40 years. An impressive wine!

In your opinion which is the most overlooked part of Burgundy?
– The Côte Chalonnaise for certain. There are beautiful vineyards, good winegrowers and great wines. There is also the Vallée des Vaux, a small valley near Mercurey with six small genuine villages and landscapes blending vineyards, fields, woods and thatch meadows. Lovely.

Speaking of food, what is not to missed when visiting Burgundy?
– Coming to Burgundy, you must eat at one of the great chefs.  They will show you the Burgundian cuisine. Here are my top five of my favourite restaurants:

• Johann Chapuis, Restaurant Greuze in Tournus

• Laurent Peugeot, Le Charlemagne in Pernand-Vergelesses

• Lameloise in Chagny

• Ludovic Briday, La Grange in Rully

• Fabien Benoit, Le Charme in Mercurey

And you can't miss the jambon persillé by Morey Traiteur in Chatenoy le Royal.

Stéphane Aladame, Domaine Stéphane Aladame, Montagny-lès-Buxy

Stéphane Aladame, Domaine Stéphane Aladame, Montagny-lès-Buxy

When it comes to Burgundian wine which is your most memorable experience?
– It is difficult to choose one particular tasting. Each tasting can be a nice memory, depending on the wine, the winegrower, the place, the friends you taste with... One of my first big tastings was a line-up of some 20 Montrachets, pratically all by winegrowers that had attended the lycée viticole in Beaune the past 20 years. I was a student at the time, a bit of a novice. I would love to do it again today.

–  In order not be too chauvinistic about white wine I would also like to mention a 1989 Chambertin Clos de Bèze tasted at Rousseau a year ago. It was magnificient.

– In fact I have only talked about the Côte de Nuits and the Côte de Beaune. How terrible, I've forgotten the Côte Chalonnaise and the Mâconnais, so here are two nice ones – a 1999 Mercurey 1er Cru Champs Martin by Bruno Lorenzon and the Pouilly-Fuissés at Daniel and Martine Barraud.

In your opinion which is the most overlooked part of Burgundy?
– Montagny bien sur!!! (he says with a smile). No, but to be more serious the Côte Chalonnaise and the Mâconnais are often forgotten to the benefit of the Côte de Nuits, the Côte de Beaune and Chablis. There are some wonderful vineyards here and the winegrowers do an equally good job as their famous neighbours. The quality is getting higher, the prices are reasonable. There are some discoveries to be made in southern Burgundy.

Speaking of food, what is not to missed when visiting Burgundy?
– The jambon persillé.

David Rebourgeon, Domaine Rebourgeon-Mure, Pommard

David Rebourgeon, Domaine Rebourgeon-Mure, Pommard

When it comes to Burgundian wine which is your most memorable experience?
– The harvest in 2003 because for the first time in 110 years we harvested in August in Burgundy. The last time one harvested in Pommard in August was actually in 1893! We harvested from six o'clock in the morning to noon, and then one hour between six and seven in the evening.

In your opinion which is the most overlooked part of Burgundy?
– All wines in Burgundy deserve to be well-known because they all have their qualities and that is what creates the wealth of this beautiful region.

Speaking of food, what is not to missed when visiting Burgundy?
– First of all one should try the gougères – puff cheese pastry – as a starter before lunch. Then for main course, coq au vin by my grandmother...

Eleanor Garvin, author of the book "At Home in Burgundy",Dijon

Eleanor Garvin, author of the book "At Home in Burgundy", Dijon

When it comes to Burgundian wine which is your most memorable experience?
–It's a toss up between pleasure and pride.

Pleasure: In the Spring of 2009, the Domaine Rapet Pere et Fils staged a Prestige Tasting of Grand Cru Corton going back to the 1949 vintage. It was, in effect, a retrospective of the winemaking career of Roland Rapet (the 'pere' in 'Pere et Fils'). We figured it was going to be a media event, with serious journalists and nobby socialites. But in true Burgundian style, the Rapets put on a family celebration and invited their friends. We came prepared to take studious notes and photos, but ended up just joining in the fun and listening to a lifetime of stories. The tasting, though invitation only, was run like an open-house; it took place over two days, and you arrived when you wanted. Vincent was there at the cuverie door, handing out programs and glasses. His young son nervously poured a mise-en-bouche glass of Aligoté while folks said hello and looked over the list of things to come. We tasted through the domain's 07 whites (the three Pernand 1er Crus, the new Beaune 1er Cru 'Bressandes' and of course the Corton-Charlemagne), and rounded out this very hospitable welcome with a little flight of Corton-Charlemagne in 03, 96 and 83. The group then moved down the street to the center of the village and the oldest cellar in the domain. The rooms were set up by decade, the 2000s, the 1990s, 80s, 70s; the stands were looked after by the Rapet family and the folks who work with Vincent. There's this thing in Burgundy about vintages that end in 'nine' (we just added another!), so the room was a-buzz: among the dozens of other wines and vintages on offer were Corton Grand Cru in 1999, 89, 79, 69, 59 and 49! So we started back through the years. We've been in Burgundy for 27 of them, so some of the first vintages we tasted were familiar, and it was a pleasure to see them at full maturity. As we moved into 70s however, the tasting took on a new dimension. These wines, though still accessible and full of life, were becoming rarities; those last few bottles. And then there at the end of the cellar sat the old stuff. There's a sense of privilege to be among the people who keep and respect such things, to hear them talk. A little sip, a shiver of understanding. Many of the people there were obviously life-long friends of Roland, so memories were dislodged as the years passed by again in the bottle. Talk of drought and hail turned easily to talk of birth and marriage; life is work and work is life. The things you can learn with a wine glass in your hand!

Pride: My husband Dennis works with an American Master of Wine, shipping small-domain wines to the US. During the last visit of the MW here in Burgundy, they tasted at the Domaine Robert Ampeau in Meursault. When they arrived home that evening for dinner, they had a bottle without a label that they said was the most remarkable of the tasting. I've been tasting Burgundy for years, but have little experience tasting "blind", so I was really pleased to be able to pinpoint that (delicious) Puligny-Montrachet...especially in front of the MW!

In your opinion which is the most overlooked part of Burgundy?
– We live in Haute Bourgogne, an area that all of northern Europe passes through en route to somewhere else. We have more cows than people. Wine production is folklorique. And at certain times of the day you can drive down country roads and not pass another car for half an hour. Yet we've got the TGV in Montbard, which puts Paris 55 minutes away. Our market town is Semur-en Auxois, a medieval gem with neutered fortifications perched on a granite outcrop above the river Armancon. The lower town has remnants of tanners' mills and toll bridges; the upper town centers around four massive towers and is topped with a fine pink church chock full of Burgundian artifacts. The town center lacks the sort of infrastructure that brings in the big buses, so tourism is discreet. Still, the town is alive (though it closes up a bit early in the evening for some!) And just down the road is Epoisses...need I say more?

Speaking of food, what is not to missed when visiting Burgundy?
– Eggs en Meurette. Here's a recipe from my book 'At Home in Burgundy'

ŒUFS EN MEURETTE
Poached Eggs in Red Wine
6 Servings

This is the best known of the red wine meurette sauce recipes, probably because it is such an unusual combination: poached eggs in red wine sauce. Served with pearl onions and bacon 'lardons' over a garlic crouton, it's a seductive classic. This same meurette sauce is also delicious served with fresh water fish.

Your choice of wine for the sauce is important. If you can, use an inexpensive Pinot Noir or maybe Beaujolais. You want fruit; you want good acidity. Color is important, but something like a Cabernet would just be too strong. This sauce reduces very slowly by two thirds its volume, and ends up brilliant and sheeny.

When choosing eggs for poaching, freshness counts. Poach them in plenty of unsalted water (salt thins out the whites) with a splash of white wine vinegar.

Traditionally, you would poach the eggs directly in the sauce. But what if one breaks? Safer to poach the eggs apart and add nap them with the sauce before serving.

For the sauce:
1 bottle of fruity red wine
3 shallots sliced (failing that, an onion)
1 carrot sliced
2 garlic cloves crushed
1 tomato quartered
1 bouquet garni (fresh parsley, thyme and bay leaf tied with kitchen twine)
A few black peppercorns
2 cups water

For the thickening agent, a beurre manie:
2 tablespoons unsalted butter at room temperature, kneaded with 2 tablespoons of flour

For the garnish:
3 tablespoons unsalted butter
Πpound of button mushrooms or larger ones quartered: optional
2 slices of Πinch-thick un-smoked bacon, cut into lardons
24 pearl onions peeled (plunging them into boiling water for 2 minutes makes peeling easier)
1 teaspoon sugar
Fine sea salt
Freshly ground black pepper
Chopped parsley
You will also need croutons that are large enough to hold a poached egg. Cut six two- inch rounds out of good quality dense bread, brush with a little melted butter, season with salt and pepper and bake for 10 minutes in a hot oven.
6 large very fresh eggs

Prepare the sauce: Put the wine into a medium saucepan and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat and ignite the wine with a match. Stand back when you do this as an entire bottle of wine sends up some impressive flames. It should continue to flame for nearly 5 minutes. If it goes out too quickly, try turning the heat up and igniting it again. When the flames subside, add shallots, garlic, tomato, bouquet garni, carrot and water. Reduce slowly over a low heat by two thirds (this will take 30–40 minutes). Strain through a fine sieve, pushing on the solids, and reserve in a clean saucepan.

For the beurre manie: Knead the butter and flour together in a small bowl. Chill.

Finishing the sauce: In a sauté pan, heat 1 tablespoon of butter with 1 tablespoon of olive oil. Sauté the mushrooms over a brisk heat until their juices have evaporated. Remove the mushrooms from the pan and reserve. Add the lardons and pearl onions to the pan, cover and cook over a low fire for 10 minutes until the onions are cooked. Return the mushrooms to the pan, sprinkle over the sugar, deglaze with a small ladleful of the sauce, cover and keep warm while you thicken the sauce.

Reheat the sauce; when bubbling add the chilled beurre manie a teaspoonful at a time, whisking until all lumps are dissolved and the sauce naps a spoon nicely. Add the onions, lardons, and mushrooms, and season with salt and pepper to taste. If the sauce is too acidic, add a pat or two of cold butter.

Poach the eggs for 3 to 4 minutes until the whites are set and the yolks soft to the touch.

Warm 6 shallow bowls or plates. Place a crouton in the bottom of each. Top with a poached egg and spoon over the sauce. Garnish with parsley and serve immediately.

WINE

You might think it obvious that you would want to drink the same wine with this dish that you used to make it. Funnily enough, this is not always the best choice. A fruity Pinot will seem tangy against the meurette sauce. Egg dishes are notoriously difficult to pair with wine. I've found that I prefer a good round Chardonnay, rich but not oaky, with a hint of minerality like Pouilly-Fuissé or Saint Veran (Denis Barraud makes both really well) or perhaps a village Chassagne-Montrachet from the Domaine Borgeot.

Celine Brocard Gueguen, Domaine Brocard, Préhy

Celine Brocard Gueguen, Domaine Brocard, Préhy

When it comes to Burgundian wine which is your most memorable experience?
– When talking about Burgundy I think about the diversity of the vineyards. And Burgundy for me is these small villages with peasant architecture, I love the stone houses. A place I particularly like to visit is Chaudenay le Château in the Côte d'Or, 25 km from Beaune. It's the village where my father was born. A lovely village where we have renovated two houses completely.

In your opinion which is the most overlooked part of Burgundy?
– For me the least known part that deserves better recognition is the Saône-et-Loire and the wines from there; for example the Rully wines are extraordinary but not well-known enough.

Speaking of food, what is not to missed when visiting Burgundy?
– One speciality not to miss is the andouillettes de Chablis; they are delicious grilled or raw. I also have a soft spot for the cheeses from the fromagerie in Saint Cyr les Colons, the chèvres frais, the go very well with our mineral Chablis wines.

Isabelle Olivier, Ferme Fruirouge, Concoeur

Isabelle Olivier, Ferme Fruirouge, Concoeur

When it comes to Burgundian wine which is your most memorable experience?
– The very first time I tasted a bit of wine was when I was a kid and it was an Echezeaux. I was surprised by the finesse. The alcohol was not evident at all. This is a fond memory that reminds me of my childhood and my father (that I lost very youn) that came from Flagey-Echezeaux, the village where I grew up.

In your opinion which is the most overlooked part of Burgundy?
– The Echezeaux without hesitation! Although it's already known among the lovers of Côte de Nuits. I love the robust wines of Vosne-Romanée and Gevrey-Chambertin, and some of Nuits-Saint-Georges, but you can't really that any of them are lesser-known. But among all these crus, while one mostly talks about the Clos or the Romanée, I very much love La Tâche, Les Richebourg, Les Malconsorts... I was married in the middle of the vines, on the road where Flagey meets Concoeur, at the lieu-dit of Derrière la Forêt, and at the dinner we had a premier cru or a grand cru from each parcel all across Vosne-Romanée. It was ten years ago and none of the bottles were corked, so we will taste them again for our wedding anniversary!!!

Speaking of food, what is not to missed when visiting Burgundy?
– For apéritif, Kir and gougères. Jambon persillé. oeufs en meurette. The chicken Gaston Gérard (made by my grand-mother, it's a treat!). The food by friends: Carole and René Pianetti at La Gentilhommière, Le Chef Coq in Nuits-Saint-Georges, Florence and Franck Boyer at La Toute Petite Auberge in Vosne-Romanée, Estelle and Denis Sangois at La Ferme de Rolle, Stéphanie and Alex Hulin at L'Epicerie & Cie in Dijon, Susanne and Jean-Louis Bottigliero in Levernois...

Florent Garaudet, Domaine Florent Garaudet, Monthelie

Florent Garaudet, Domaine Florent Garaudet, Monthelie

When it comes to Burgundian wine which is your most memorable experience?
– My first harvest of course! It was the result of several years of research, studies, training, reflection and work! It is very recently, and it is probably because of these moments of tension and anxiety – but also because of madness, happiness and humour – that it is unforgettable. Indeed, 2008 was a difficult vintage. I had to be very careful throughout the year and especially during the most important period, the summer! No holidays! Quality comes first and I am very proud of what I achieved.

In your opinion which is the most overlooked part of Burgundy?
– Unfortunately the most neglected are the small villages of Burgundy, often with lesser-known appellations. Still, the price/quality ratio is excellent because they are working tirelessly to achieve very good results. For example, Monthelie lives in the shadow of its neighbours Volnay and Meursault and does not always attract very much attention in professional media. I think the big appellations no longer need to be put forward, as long as they keep the quality that made them well-know they will remain where they are! People are tired of always hearing the same names, the lesser-known names are a source of renewal for Burgundy lovers...

Speaking of food, what is not to missed when visiting Burgundy?
– The traditional dishes of Burgundy are not to be missed! The snails, the famous coq au vin, the boeuf bourguignon and the oeufs en meurette are a few examples. Cheeses such as the Amour de Nuits, the Époisses, le Citeaux (from the abbey of the same name, a place to visit, both for a bit of history and tasting). The desserts – my favorites are pears poached in red wine, milles feuilles aux pains d 'épice milles feuilles aux pains d 'épice with vanilla ice cream. You'll find all these dishes in great restaurants along the Côte d'Or, restaurants such as the Hostellerie de Levernois, La Diligence in Meursault, and the Grilladine and the Jardin des Remparts in Beaune.

Jeremy Seysses, Domaine Dujac, Morey-Saint-Denis

Jeremy Seysses, Domaine Dujac, Morey-Saint-Denis

When it comes to Burgundian wine which is your most memorable experience?
– It's hard to single one out. The list seems to get longer every day... As a sentimental favourite, I will choose doing pigeage as kids with my brothers. Like many boys, we wanted to do what our dad did, and during harvest, many hours were devoted to punching down the grapes by foot. However, all of our wines were whole cluster at the time (some are now destemmed partially). This made for a remarkably firm cap during the active part of fermentations. My brothers and I could walk across a tank, jump up and down on it, and never succeed in going through, much to our frustration. It wasn't till we were closer to ten years old that we began carrying the weight and strength that would have allowed us to actually be of some use, but of course, at that stage, we were much less interested.

In your opinion which is the most overlooked part of Burgundy?
– For me it's the lesser appellations, especially village level. When well made, they offer the best value/terroir ratio. Sticking with what I know, I think that Morey with just about 60 ha of village, offers great consistency while remaining reasonable price-wise. Further afield, I am really enjoying drinking Beaujolais these days.

Speaking of food, what is not to missed when visiting Burgundy?
– My favourite place to eat is la Ferme de la Ruchotte between Bligny sur Ouche and Bessey en Chaume (west of Beaune). They are open only on weekends for lunch. The chef/farmer raises all his own animals, mostly chickens and all his vegetables come from Yanick Loubet, an organic grower in Beaune.

For individual food stuffs:
– Jambon persillé from Vié in Nuits St Georges and Alviset in Dijon
– Époisses from Berthaut
– Citeaux from the Abbaye de Citeaux

Anne-Marie & Philippe Dufouleur, Les Jardins de Loïs/Domaine Lois Dufouleur, Beaune

Anne-Marie & Philippe Dufouleur, Les Jardins de Loïs/Domaine Lois Dufouleur, Beaune

When it comes to Burgundian wine which is your most memorable experience?
– The best moment for a winemaker is to experience great vintages such as 1999. Tremendous quality of the grapes, which makes amazing wines! 2009 is a very similar experience for us, these years really value our work across the year in the vineyard and make us proud of producing such great wines from Burgundy.

In your opinion which is the most overlooked part of Burgundy?
– For Domaine Lois Dufouleur it is a constant battle to make Beaune a more memorable and well-known appellation, as it produces great wines. Beaune does not have a grand cru appellation, but we do think that sometimes it should. We have ourselves invested in a great project, Le Clos des Perrieres, Beaune 1er Cru, to produce outstanding red wine. We planted the vineyard in 2002, where it was only a wood... analysed the soil, selected the best plants from a research lab, and conducted the vine very carefully. We know we can produce a great wine which make us proud of the Beaune appellation. However, Domaine Lois Dufouleur is not the only one, everyone in Beaune try and make a difference to promote the appellation as well as our association (Syndicat viticole de Beaune).

Speaking of food, what is not to missed when visiting Burgundy?
– Les Oeufs en Meurette!!! Poached eggs in a wine sauce or traditionnally done with the lie de vin, which sits at the bottom of the oak barrels.

Fabien Espana, Restaurant Le Soufflot, Irancy

Régis Bouvier, Domaine Régis Bouvier, Marsannay-la-Côte

When it comes to Burgundian wine which is your most memorable experience?
– My most memorable moment was the harvest in August 2005.

In your opinion which is the most overlooked part of Burgundy?
– I would say that Marsannay deserves a better recognition.

Speaking of food, what is not to missed when visiting Burgundy?
– When coming to Burgundy you must not miss the jambon persillé.

Fabien Espana, Restaurant Le Soufflot, Irancy

Fabien Espana, Restaurant Le Soufflot, Irancy

When it comes to Burgundian wine which is your most memorable experience?
– Obviously, being born and bred in Burgundy there are many memories and occasions that come to mind... There was a Chablis Blanchot 1995 at Domaine Raveneau – a unique moment in terms of complexity in a wine... superb! Then there was a vertical tasting – from 2007 to 1973 – at Domaine Jean-Paul & Benoît Droin...

In your opinion which is the most overlooked part of Burgundy?
– Coming from Irancy I would say my own village – the panoramas, the cherry trees in bloom, the vineyards, the people, the cellars, the winemakers, the wine and of course the little restaurant and bar in the village...

– And outside my region, I have great memories from the top of the Solutré Rock in Pouilly-Fuissé. There is a wonderful view from up there; on a clear day you can see the Mont Blanc. You see all the valleys, the vines... And you have the wonderful white wines to taste.

Speaking of food, what is not to missed when visiting Burgundy?
– Being a restaurant owner the list will be long, and it will take week if nothing is to missed... and you will put on five kg. For starters you have the jambon persillé, the escargots, the oeufs en meurette and the gougères. For main course you have the boeuf bourguignon, the magret de canard aux griottes, the jambon à la chablisienne and the sandre à l'irancy. Then our cheeses – époisses, chaource, soumaintrain, saint felicien etc. All enjoyed with a glass of good Burgundy wine – young, old, white, red or rosé – its all your choice.

Pierre Bart, Domaine Bart, Marsannay-la-Côte

Pierre Bart, Domaine Bart, Marsannay-la-Côte

When it comes to Burgundian wine which is your most memorable experience?
– It was a DRC La Tâche from 1989 that I had at a restaurant four years ago. It had an incomparable freshness, a touch of liquorice and a perfect balance.

In your opinion which is the most overlooked part of Burgundy?
– Marsannay-la-Côte of course! Not only because I am a winegrower here, but also because the soils are very varied and there is a very good price/quality ratio. It's a young appellation, from 1987. There are also some discussions today about adding premier crus. More on this project later.

Speaking of food, what is not to missed when visiting Burgundy?
– There is also a very strong potential in the Hautes-Côtes (both Hautes-Côtes de Beaune and Hautes-Côtes de Nuits) for the same reason; a very good price/quality ratio. But I will stop here, because there is much to be said.

Jean-Michel Chartron, Domaine Jean Chartron, Puligny-Montrachet

Jean-Michel Chartron, Domaine Jean Chartron, Puligny-Montrachet

When it comes to Burgundian wine which is your most memorable experience?
– The tasting of a bottle of Romanée-Conti 1937 shared with my wife and two close friends at restaurant Lameloise in Chagny. A wonderful wine, wonderful people and wonderful cuisine made this wonderful moment. Nearly the same thing happened just a few weeks ago with good friends in a much more simple restaurant like Alex in Louhans, while sharing a Tête de veau sauce Gribiche with a magnum of Puligny-Montrachet 1er Cru Clos de la Pucelle Monopole 1996 from our estate.

In your opinion which is the most overlooked part of Burgundy?
– There are so many wines from less renowned villages like Rully in Côte Chalonnaise, or like Saint Aubin, Saint Romain or Savigny in Côte de Beaune, that offer such a great wines… and above all… such good value!

Speaking of food, what is not to missed when visiting Burgundy?
– There are so many lovely recipes in Burgundy! Let's take five examples. The roasted Bresse chicken with Epoisse Berthaut sauce of restaurant Caveau des Arches in Beaune. The steamed lobster tail and vegetables with a light creamy sauce served in a glass jar of restaurant Le Benaton in Beaune. The pan seared sweetbreads of restaurant Auberge du Vieux Vigneron in Corpeau. The homemade pike quenelle – quenelle de brochet – of restaurant Le Gourmandin in Beaune. And to end with, try the frog legs simply pan seared with garlic and parsley on the terrace in front of the Saone River at restaurant Au Beau Rivage in Allerey sur Saône. Enjoy!

Maxime Champaud, Domaine Philippe Germain, Nantoux

Maxime Champaud, Domaine Philippe Germain, Nantoux

When it comes to Burgundian wine which is your most memorable experience?
– It's very difficult to tell which is the most memorable. I'll just talk about three of them: the first one is a tasting from barrels of the 2005 vintage at Vincent Dauvissat's cellar, with himself, just marvelous for the wines and for the great guy, fantastic... The second was a Volnay Taillepieds 2001 from Nicolas Rossignol, an idea of the perfection. The third was a bottle of Puligny-Montrachet Champgains 2000 from Comte Lafon, sweetness and freshness, purity, unbelievable...

In your opinion which is the most overlooked part of Burgundy?
– I think all the vineyards pf Monthélie and Auxey-Duresses are not as wellknown as they should Naturally, we produce and sell those two wines in white and red in our cellar and I don't tell that for this reason. Everyone who taste is always surprised and happy to find a Burgundy wine they don't often drink, which is very pleasant, something they don't need to wait many years to drink, and especially with low prices...

Speaking of food, what is not to missed when visiting Burgundy?
– I think eggs in red wine sauce, oeufs en meurette, is the course to taste. Difficult to forget our famous snails, just cooked with butter and parsley, a bit of bread, with a glass of Meursault, two or three friends... "What else" as George Clooney says in the TV commercial, it's the same for this...

Fabrice Laronze, Domaine des Terres de Velle, Auxey-Duresses

Fabrice Laronze, Domaine des Terres de Velle, Auxey-Duresses

When it comes to Burgundian wine which is your most memorable experience?
– It was in the dark side of an old cellar in Beaune. I was alone with my tastevin and a light. I was a young – very young – cellar rat at Maison Joseph Drouhin and I was in charge of racking a barrel: this means I had the responsability to separate the lies from the clear wine, a very delicate and precise task, especially since this wine was a 1989 Montrachet Grand Cru Marquis de Laguiche... What a memorable day; from this moment I understood why I was studing oenology, why I wanted to become a winemaker, and simply why Burgundy is worlwide so fascinating!

In your opinion which is the most overlooked part of Burgundy?
– The Auxois area, of course; it is not far away from Beaune (30 min on the motorway – direction Paris), the landscape is totally different, it is very green, the heritage is rich, there are lot of places to visit – Chateauneuf, Commarin, Semur-en-Auxois, Flavigny and don't miss the Church of Saint-Thibault (where I was married !). You can also bike there near the canal de Bourgogne.

Speaking of food, what is not to missed when visiting Burgundy?
– There are plenty of good restaurants in Burgundy, but have a break, have a picnic in the vines for exemple. There is a good baker's in every small village where you can buy a delicious baguette. A good charcutier preparing his own jambon persillé is also easy to find. You can buy an Epoisses cheese at the supermarket if it is a Berthaut one and that's it! Call me if you need a good bottle of Auxey-Duresses, Volnay or Puligny-Montrachet and enjoy...

Benoît Charbonnaud, Maison André Delorme, Rully

Benoît Charbonnaud, Maison André Delorme, Rully

When it comes to Burgundian wine which is your most memorable experience?
– In 1985 I was a student in oenology at Maison Louis Jadot. I had the chance to participate in a vertical tasting of Corton-Charlemagne, from 1966 to 1983. Coming from Charente (in western France) I was mainly into the sauvignons. It was love at first sight and I have never left these great big white burgundies.

In your opinion which is the most overlooked part of Burgundy?
– The Crémants de Bourgogne. For a long time we have been talking about technique, but now we also talk about terroir. It brings subtleties of origin, like you can see in a Chablis, a Meursault or a Pouilly. Selecting the parcels is crucial and like with still wine you can't make good crémants without good land and good grapes.

Speaking of food, what is not to missed when visiting Burgundy?
– Burgundy has a very rich gastronomy. You must try the jambon persillé au Bouzeron, the snails and cheeses such as the rare Cîteaux and the exceptional Époisses.

David George-Perpiña, Domaine George, Courgis

David George-Perpiña, Domaine George, Courgis

When it comes to Burgundian wine which is your most memorable experience?
– My first tasting of the Hospices de Beaune wines, in 2005 at the Hospices.

In your opinion which is the most overlooked part of Burgundy?
– Probably the Maranges wines. Particularly from Domaine Regnaudot and Domaine Bouthenet.

Speaking of food, what is not to missed when visiting Burgundy?
– The jambon persillé and gougères!!

Albéric Bichot, Maison Albert Bichot, Beaune

Albéric Bichot, Maison Albert Bichot, Beaune

When it comes to Burgundian wine which is your most memorable experience?
– The tasting of a Musigny Grand Cru 1997 from Domaine Comte de Vogüe, that took place in our St Nicolas XIVth century cellars, for the 60 years wedding anniversary of my grandparents. Or the tasting of one of our estate wines, Grands Echezeaux Grand Cru from Domaine du Clos Frantin, 1990 vintage, tasted with close friends for the 1999/2000 New Year's Eve.

In your opinion which is the most overlooked part of Burgundy?
– The Hautes-Côtes de Nuits. A cooler climate allows a typical yet different expression of pinot noir. Wines with density, complexity and generosity at the same time, at a good price. A very nice landscape too, great for walking in autumn as there are many places in the hills with great views over the valleys, vineyards and forests.

Speaking of food, what is not to missed when visiting Burgundy?
– Apart from the very traditional cooking, I personally enjoy a brouillade d'oeufs à la truffe de Bourgogne. (scrambled eggs with Burgundy truffles). To be appreciated with a wine like our Meursault 1er Cru Les Charmes from Domaine du Pavillon, especially with eight to ten years of age, so that it develops a buttery mouth but still has some tension in it. Easy to prepare, but quality of ingredients is the key to success.

Nicolas Rossignol, Domaine Nicolas Rossignol, Volnay

Nicolas Rossignol, Domaine Nicolas Rossignol, Volnay

When it comes to Burgundian wine which is your most memorable experience?
– It's easy to say Romanée-Conti for the most memorable experience, but there's also Domaine Georges Roumier – for me Christophe's wines are the most beautiful reds in Burgundy at the moment. And also Domaine Guy Roulot in Meursault – Jean Marc works with so much purity!

In your opinion which is the most overlooked part of Burgundy?
– St Aubin is not at the right level, it's maybe one of the best white wines in Burgundy – an appellation change a lot with many good winegrowers – Olivier Lamy, Marc Colin, Domaine Larue, Domaine Bouton etc.

Speaking of food, what is not to missed when visiting Burgundy?
– There are many good things to eat in Burgundy and many good restaurants at high level. There are cheeses like Époisses and Citeaux, snails of course – and not necessarily with butter and garlic, but cooked in many other ways, and one of the best meats ... the Charolais!

Claire Naudin, Domaine Henri Naudin-Ferrand, Magny-les-Villers

Claire Naudin, Domaine Henri Naudin-Ferrand, Magny-les-Villers

When it comes to Burgundian wine which is your most memorable experience?
– My tasting at the Domaine de la Romanée Conti in 1993. This really shook my world as a young oenologist. Where I expected power and concentration I found elegance, finesse and emotion. The techinal challange was enormous after this.

In your opinion which is the most overlooked part of Burgundy?
– The Hautes-Côtes vignoble is unfairly overlooked. You find very interesting terroirs here, old vines, wines with an excellent price/quality ratio and highly motivated winemakers, because they have often started from scratch and they are used to fight hard!

Speaking of food, what is not to missed when visiting Burgundy?
– Don't miss the nonettes roties à l'Époisses, a sweet and sour dish that is easy to prepare and that is a off the beaten path, an explosion of flavours that brings together our history (the spices) and our cheese heritage (the Époisses).

Blair Pethel, Domaine Dublère, Beaune

Blair Pethel, Domaine Dublère, Beaune

When it comes to Burgundian wine which is your most memorable experience?
– A magnum of 1978 Chateau de la Tour Clos Vougeot, which I served to my prospective parents-in-law the first time I ever met the. I had bought the magnum on my first ever trip to Burgundy in 1987. When the time came to meet my future wife's parents, I was already living with their daughter. Thus we invited them to our flat in London, where they would have to be on their best behavior, rather than go to their house, where I would have to behave. The Clos Vougeot worked like a charm, and my wife and I just celebrated our 18th wedding anniversary.

In your opinion which is the most overlooked part of Burgundy?
– For me, the walk between Curtil-Vergy and the ruined Abbaye de St. Vivant in the Hautes Cotes de Nuits is spectacular, and little seen by tourists. On a spring day, with the wildflowers blooming and the views stretching forever into the horizon, it's magical. Then you come to the ruins! What an atmosphere, to stand in the place where the monks lived who trekked every day over the hills to Vosne to tend their vines in the Middle Ages.

Speaking of food, what is not to missed when visiting Burgundy?
– Fabienne Escoffier's sweetbreads a la crème. And Fabienne Escoffier's œufs en murette. And the tarte normande from Boucher. And a runny Epoisses from Alain Hess. And a baguette from the former Sebstian Fischer. And local asparagus in spring. And a roast poulet noir. And Lameloise. And the list goes on and on…

Sylvain Dussort, Domaine Sylvain Dussort, Meursault

Sylvain Dussort, Domaine Sylvain Dussort, Meursault

When it comes to Burgundian wine which is your most memorable experience?
– In Burgundy we are really lucky to have so many tastings, receptions and dinner parties, so it is sometimes difficult to choose one. But being a producer in Meursault I keep the famous Paulée de Meursault, as one of my favourite memories; this magic day when you can taste more than 100 different wines, starting with a ten year old aligoté, then moving on to the premiers crus of Meursault and then finishing off with the marcs and fines de Bourgogne or even Irish whiskey served by the guests in kilts.

In your opinion which is the most overlooked part of Burgundy?
– I like to go on quad bike, and at the moment I have the chance to go riding around the Lac des Settons, a lake in the Nièvre, just in the heart of the Parc Naturel Régional du Morvan, as well as around two other lesser-known lakes – the Lac de Pannecière and the Lac de Saint Agnan. Here you can enjoy all kinds of outdoor actvities, go hiking or ride mountain bike.

Speaking of food, what is not to missed when visiting Burgundy?
– As an aperitif, a real Kir (crème de cassis and aligoté) with gougères (choux pastry with cheese); the escargots de bourgogne, jambon persillé, the oeufs en meurettes; the Charolais beef or fricassée de volaille de Bresse à la crème; the cheeses – the Époisses and the Délice de Bourgogne.

Philippe Dève, 1000 Bourgognes, Beaune

Philippe Dève, 1000 Bourgognes, Beaune

When it comes to Burgundian wine which is your most memorable experience?
– I've spent all my summer holidays in a small village in the Hautes Côtes de Beaune. We had great fun helping the winegrowers of the village in the vineyards (ah, the pêches de vigne, wild peaches, were a real treat) and our reward was to go down the cellar and taste (with moderation) the wines that were maturing. It was there that I learnt to appreciate the Burgundy wines. I still remember a Pommard from 1959, a great year!

In your opinion which is the most overlooked part of Burgundy?
– I still enjoy it very much to go through the little village of Monthelie where you have the most beautiful view over Meursault and Auxey-Duresses. This part of the Côtes de Beaune is a real treat for the eyes, where the vineyards and the sky change depending on the time of day or season.

Speaking of food, what is not to missed when visiting Burgundy?
– When you come to Beaune you shouldn't miss the jambon persillé. It's only here that they know how to make it. I prefer the one from Moron in Pommard. It's without a doubt the best. You can also buy it on the market in Beaune on Saturday mornings.

Patrick Essa, Domaine Buisson Charles, Meursault

Patrick Essa, Domaine Buisson Charles, Meursault

When it comes to Burgundian wine which is your most memorable experience?
– There is not just one, but numerous great wines that we have tasted in the family on holidays and birthdays. I remember a Pommard Rugiens 1919 or 1929 when I wasn't yet 20, Meursault Charmes from 1947 and 1949 that were the last bottles from grand père's cellar and also a sumptuous Volnay Santenots from 1929 that I had for my 40th birthday. These wines were unbelievably youthful, able to hold up against time!

In your opinion which is the most overlooked part of Burgundy?
– I own a small house up in the arrière côte, not far from the Morvan. I love to walk in the woods that surrounds it, where I can go for my favourite leisure activity; picking mushrooms. Walking alone among the tall trees gives me a lot of peace and pleasure. The forests in Burgundy are there to be discovered for the wilderness and the beauty. Now, off you go!

Speaking of food, what is not to missed when visiting Burgundy?
Pigeon en vessie - pigeon in pig's bladder – at Lameloise (in Chagny). Contrary to the traditional Burgundian dishes – snails, oeufs en meurette for example – it enhances the qualities of the Côte d'Or wines and it is undoubtedly the most complex meat you can have with a grand cru, white or red. It's great art and a very refined delicacy that is a work of civilization.

Grégory Vallet, Hôtel-Restaurant de la Poste et du Lion d'Or, Vézelay

Grégory Vallet, Hôtel-Restaurant de la Poste et du Lion d'Or, Vézelay

When it comes to Burgundian wine which is your most memorable experience?
– Admittedly both my wife Magali and I really appreciate this kind of pleasures... Until now the most memorable moment was last autumn when we went tasting at three of our partners in the Côte de Beaunee and the Côte de Nuits; to taste for example a Corton Charlemagne 2007 in front of  a feuillette as well as a Volnay, Meursault, Pommard...

In your opinion which is the most overlooked part of Burgundy?
– I think the Morvan deserves a wider recognition because of its rich flora (wildflowers, mushrooms, firs) and fauna, lakes and ponds; it's perfect for people who love peaceful open spaces. The views are exceptional, there's nothing like it in the rest of the region.

Speaking of food, what is not to missed when visiting Burgundy?
– When it comes to specialities, that you can have any time of the day, these are the ones I prefer:
- The snails obviously!!! In all shapes and forms...
- The cheeses: Epoisses, Brillat, Chaource, Aisy Cendré, Abbaye de la Pierre qui Vire, l'Ami du Chambertin, crottins du Morvan, Caillé de chévre...
- The mustards and the pain d'épices
- Dishes made with red wine; Œufs pochés, Boeuf Bourguignon, Poires au vin...
- The candy (Négus de Nevers), but also the chocolate and the Cassis...
- And finally of course, the wines, from the Auxerrois, Chablis, the Côte de Nuits, the Côte de Beaune, the Mâconnais and Chalonnaise...

Thibault Liger-Belair, Domaine Thibault Liger-Belair

Thibault Liger-Belair, Domaine Thibault Liger-Belair, Nuits-Saint-Georges

When it comes to Burgundian wine which is your most memorable experience?
– My most memorable experience was on my first job in Paris when I was 22. I worked for a company who organized some wine events and one day they had a tasting with the Domaine de la Romanée Conti wines and my job was to open all the bottles – more than 30 bottles – and to taste all for to see if there are no problem with each one. I have tasted a vertical of all the wines in 1991 vintage from Echezeaux to Romanée Conti, simply amazing.

In your opinion which is the most overlooked part of Burgundy?
– When you come from Hautes-Côtes de Nuits to the Côtes de Nuits you have a very nice view of the hautes côtes with a lot of valleys and you arrive by the Route de Chaux in Nuits-Saint-Georges and you have the view of all the Côtes and in front of you the Jura. During winter with a very clear weather you can see the Mont Blanc and all the Côte de Beaune, sometimes I stop a minute for to look the view it's always different and pretty.

Speaking of food, what is not to missed when visiting Burgundy?
– I love to go to the market in Beaune on Saturday mornings, you have a small producer of organic vegetables at the corner of the market, and after I buy some cheese to the fromager Alain Hess. But also a good Côte de Boeuf from Charolais grilled with some vine wood. The fat of the meat make a beautiful association with the tannins of a Nuits Saint Georges, very simple and very good.

Daniel-Etienne Defaix, Domaine Du Vieux Château Chablis,Chablis

Daniel-Etienne Defaix, Domaine Du Vieux Château Chablis, Chablis

When it comes to Burgundian wine which is your most memorable experience?
– A Chablis premier cru Les Lys 1893, as well as one from 1915 which was vinified by the women during the war. They had never vinified previously (They didn't even go down in the cellar before!!!) And it was very good.

In your opinion which is the most overlooked part of Burgundy?
– Marsannay on the Côte d'Or produces very good reds. The crus from Beaujolias, for those who accept them as being Burgundian; a Fleurie has a remarkable ageing potential. The original premiers crus of Chablis, often overshadowed by the emblematic and very commercial straight Chablis.

Speaking of food, what is not to missed when visiting Burgundy?
– Les escargots de bourgogne. Les andouillettes au Chablis tirées à la ficelle. La moutarde aux graines de bourgogne et au vin de bourgogne. Les œufs en meurettes. Le jambon à la chablisienne. Les  filets de sole au chablis. Le coq au Chablis ou au Chambertin.

Alain Suguenot, Beaune.

Alain Suguenot, Member of parliament and Mayor of Beaune

When it comes to Burgundian wine which is your most memorable experience?
– A friend gave me a bottle of Romanée Conti. We opened it the same evening. I remember this exceptional moment very well. It was a summer's night and we were having dinner out on the terrace. There are not words to describe this fine moment of joy and delight that we shared with friends.

In your opinion which is the most overlooked part of Burgundy?
– The Val de Saône deserves to be better-known. It's a territory which history goes back to the Middle-Ages; there is a rural landscape with the river, the meadows and the forests. The small town of Saint-Jean de Losne that dates back to the 13th century is today the leading river marina in France. It's an ideal starting point for a cruise on the canals.

Speaking of food, what is not to missed when visiting Burgundy?
– Burgundian gastronomy is very tasty. As for myself, I particularly like the œufs en meurettes. And of course, you can't miss the famous snails, even if this speciality may seem a bit odd for visitors from other countries.

Alexandrine Roy, Domaine Marc Roy

Alexandrine Roy, Domaine Marc Roy, Gevrey-Chambertin

When it comes to Burgundian wine which is your most memorable experience?
– As a Burgundian winegrower I have very unique opportunities to taste very unique wines. I get to attend "private" tastings where I have the chance to taste very rare and amazing wines. Some really impressed me! Among my best memories is a vertical tasting of Musigny from Comte Georges de Vogüe at the IPNC (International Pinot Noir Celebration) in 2004. It was the first time I tasted it, and I will never forget it.

In your opinion which is the most overlooked part of Burgundy?
– I think we tend to forget "small" appellations, like Marsannay, which is most "famous" for its rosé wine… But it does not reflect the richness of the wines produced in this area. Some Marsannay reds are amazing and completely unknown.

– From my own experience; I have two small parcels in Les Champs Perdrix (Marsannay) located on the slope of the hill that produc a fantastic white wine from chardonnay grapes. I have to fight hard to convince people to try it. But everybody who taste it become hooked!

Speaking of food, what is not to missed when visiting Burgundy?
– There are too many culinary specialities in Burgundy to be listed here… But I would say the famous Oeufs en Meurette is great as well as the Boeuf Bourguignon. These dishes are very typical and absolutely delicious when well-cooked… A place where I like to eat is Les Tontons in Beaune. Authentic cooking made with fresh, local and mainly "bio" ingredients… Great place to go.

Romaric Chavy, Domaine Chavy-Chouet

Romaric Chavy, Domaine Chavy-Chouet, Meursault

When it comes to Burgundian wine which is your most memorable experience?
– For many many years, my grand father (Domaine Chavy-Ropiteau) sold his whole production to negociants and because of that we don't have so many old bottles in the "oenothèque". But I had a great surprise one day at the Paulée de Meursault with a Meursault 1er cru Genévrières 1979 that my grandfather made and it was very special for me!

In your opinion which is the most overlooked part of Burgundy?
– I'm a big fan of the Côte Chalonnaise, I think they deserve more interest and more recognition for the high overall quality of their wines. It is my favorite choice in restaurants. Of course there are the "stars" that everybody knows, Domaine Milan in Chassey-le-camp is doing great!

Speaking of food, what is not to missed when visiting Burgundy?
– My grandfather on my mother's side is a cook and the butcher of Meursault so I have learned some of his famous recipes, like saucisson sec and jambon persillé. The "Terrine chaude de la mère Daugier" at the restaurant Le Chevreuil in Meursault is amazing and Le Comptoir des Tontons in Beaune is my favorite place to have a very good meal.

Claire Forestier, Terres d'Arômes

Claire Forestier, Terres d'Arômes, Nuits-Saint-Georges

When it comes to Burgundian wine which is your most memorable experience?
– Smelling the delicate perfume developed by the flowers of the vines. This happens at the flowering season, mid June. One has to set your nose right next to the flower (the head inside the canopy) and breathe slowly. The palette of aromas is amazing and it will be different from one vineyard to another.

In your opinion which is the most overlooked part of Burgundy?
– I love driving from Vosne Romanée towards Vougeot at the sunset, in June. On a clear day, a few morning clouds, near the Clos de Vougeot, looking west on the hill, the light is beautiful and dramatic, the colors are stunning.

– Another place I love is the Maconnais area, where I grew up: hiking to the top of Vergisson or Solutré, contemplating the view:  the vineyards and the villages down below.

Speaking of food, what is not to missed when visiting Burgundy?
– Here is my shopping list:
• Jambon Persillé (Boucherie Vié in Nuits-St-Georges) . With a 2007 Monthélie Blanc – Terres d'Arômes.
• Cote de Boeuf Charolais grilled on a fire place (Boucherie Vossot Rue Maufoux in Beaune) and Burgundian truffles mashed potatoes (harvest period October to Christmas time). With a 2007 Nuits-Saint-Georges, Charmottes – Terres d'Arômes.
• Cheeses: Epoisses Berthaud, Delice de Pommard and Comté aged 24 months (Fromagerie Hess in Beaune). With a 2007 Mazoyères-Chambertin – Terres d'Arômes.
• Macarons from the Patisserie Bouché and Mango Sorbet (Place Monge in Beaune). With a 2002 Champagne Grand Cru Blanc de Noir – Gonet-Medeville.

Jean-Claude Brelière, Domaine Jean-Claude Brelière

Jean-Claude Brelière, Domaine Jean-Claude Brelière, Rully

When it comes to Burgundian wine which is your most memorable experience?
– My most memorable experience is when my father opened a bottle of his white Rully, Les Margotés 1er Cru from 1956, to celebrate my return home in 1983. I was then 33 years old and I had decided to take on the domaine after my parents. It has been a unique moment in my life.

In your opinion which is the most overlooked part of Burgundy?
– It is the Côte Chalonnaise, where we have our vineyards, that deserves a large rand better reputation, for the quality of its production and the good value.

Speaking of food, what is not to missed when visiting Burgundy?
– One should not miss the Coq au Vin, the Boeuf Bourguignon, the Jambon Persillé and the famous cheeses.

Alexandre Leclercq

Alexandre Leclercq, Caveau de la Tour, Meursault

When it comes to Burgundian wine which is your most memorable experience?
– When I did a vertical tasting on Drouhin's Clos des Mouches Blanc from 1994 to 2004. Fabulous evening with one of the most beautiful wines in Burgundy.

In your opinion which is the most overlooked part of Burgundy?
– I started to drink burgundy wines with Aloxe-Corton from Edmond Cornu: great wine. So I believe Aloxe-Corton, Pernand-Vergelesses, Ladoix are overlooked by the market. But in fact that's ok, because the production is small, and we have enough wines for the local consumption.

Speaking of food, what is not to missed when visiting Burgundy?
– For the tourist, they can find many restaurants with local specialities. But I prefer to recommend the market in Beaune on Saturday mornings. You must buy your bread at a little "etal" on the market. Just near the entrance of Hospices de Beaune. The lady makes her own bread, seven differents varieties, 100% organic bread. Just fabulous.

– Inside the hall (in front of the Hospices de Beaune) you can find a guy who sell the most fantastic Comté I ever tasted. He comes from Jura with the local production in Comté, oldest one (up to 30 mounths aged), young and fruity one. Some pieces of charcuterie. Excellent for your health.

– On 4 Rue Monge, in Beaune, Charcuterie Raillard who produce the most extraordinary Jambon Persillé of the region. You can't miss this speciality from Burgundy, and you must to buy it there.

– And one last thing – visit Arcenant for the liquor of blackberry and other red fruits.

Jean-Pierre Renard

Jean-Pierre Renard, A Taste of Burgundy, Echevronne

When it comes to Burgundian wine which is your most memorable experience?
– A Meursault-Charmes 1846 Bouchard Père et Fils, tasted in November 2006, which was served at the dinner to celebrate the 150th anniversary of the wine merchant Bouchard Père et Fils. Its amber colour with mahogany tints, its extraordinary complex nose and the still agreeable sensation in the mouth have left an unforgettable memory. It was a moment of rare emotion for the 70 people present.

In your opinion which is the most overlooked part of Burgundy?
The Hautes-Côtes which are situated only a few kilometres from the Route des Grands Crus, offer visitors beautiful panoramas. The limestone plateau broken up by wild coombs framed by impressive cliffs (Arcenant, Saint-Romain, Bouilland, Orches….). One shouldn't miss the magnificent view one has from the hill above the picturesque village of Pernand-Vergelesses.

Speaking of food, what is not to missed when visiting Burgundy?
– Without any doubt – Oeufs en Meurette – (Eggs poached in a red wine sauce) never fails to please visitors who come here to enjoy good food and wine. Of course the traditional way is to poach the eggs in the sauce and not add them later. Not to be missed.

Sylvain Bouhélier – Domaine Sylvain Bouhélier

Sylvain Bouhélier, Domaine Sylvain Bouhélier, Chaumont-le-Bois

When it comes to Burgundian wine which is your most memorable experience?
– The harvest of 1993 is a very fond memory. It was the first time I vinified my wine. The inauguration of the wine press together with friends and the people in the village is an unforgettable moment, the beginning of an adventure...

In your opinion which is the most overlooked part of Burgundy?
– In the north of Côte d'Or is the Châtillonnais, which is part of the secret Burgundy. The beauty of the landscape and the charm of the small villages make it a welcoming and peaceful place. But it is also a place where history is present everywhere – you have the treasures of Vix (the Vix krater is the largest known vessel for wine from antiquity) and the monastery at Molesme (cradle of the Cistercian Order). The Châtillonnais is also the best place for the Crémant de Bourgogne!

Speaking of food, what is not to missed when visiting Burgundy?
– The pain d'epice (gingerbread) is a must in Burgundian gastronomy. The top restaurants use it for delicious sweet and sour dishes. You can also enjoy it with a black currant sorbet and a good Crémant de Bourgogne demi-sec.

Stéphanie Courtault-Michelet – Domaine Jean-Claude Courtault

Stéphanie Courtault-Michelet, Domaine Jean-Claude Courtault, Lignorelles

When it comes to Burgundian wine which is your most memorable experience?
– A memory from tasting; a Petit Chablis 1999... with the class of a premier cru. That was the comment by a class of oenologists tasting the wines of the domaine. If our domaine has a good reputation for its fresh and fruity Petit Chablis the 1999 was particularly successful. We have tasted this perfectly structured wine more recently and it still holds up.

– A memory from vinification; Chablis 2002 – a wonderful vintage for Domaine Jean-Claude Courtault. During the vinification the lees had a wonderful bouquet. The cellar was filled with this lovely smell. It was a real pleasure doing the racking. The bouquet and pleasure were perfectly restored in the wine. It resulted in a perfectly stuctured wine, with subtle aromas and a good length. Magnums of this wine can still be kept for another ten years.

In your opinion which is the most overlooked part of Burgundy?
– The Chablis region, where the river Serein flows, is a very hilly vignoble where it is easy to understand the four appellation levels depending on slope and exposure. You can discover it by car or by foot; in the valleys covered by vines or at the top of a hill (like Lignorelles) – the views are wonderful.

Speaking of food, what is not to missed when visiting Burgundy?
– Gougères (choux pastry with gruyère), with Petit Chablis as an apéritif… it's the perfect way to whet your appetite.

Didier and Michel Lamblin - Lamblin & Fils

Didier and Michel Lamblin, Lamblin & Fils, Maligny

When it comes to Burgundian wine which is your most memorable experience?
– Last week we welcomed a group of Canadians and for this occasion we opened a bottle of Chablis 1er Cru Fourchaumes 1983. Despite of the yield of this vintage (+70hl/ha), after 25 years, the quality was definitely exceptional! This wine was vinified by our father, Jacques Lamblin, and it was a great moment of "souvenirs" to share.

In your opinion which is the most overlooked part of Burgundy?
– The Chablis vineyard is covered by 20 small lovely villages. To understand the appellations of Chablis, the terroir, its relief and typicity, it is absolutely needed to visit them all – especially Maligny, very well known for its 1ers crus Fourchaumes!

Speaking of food, what is not to missed when visiting Burgundy?
– Jambon à la Chablisienne - just perfectly delicious.

Jim Tanner – La Boutique de Bacchus

Jim Tanner, La Boutique de Bacchus, Nantoux 

Jim Tanner is also the author of the book Vintage France: Adventures Along the French Wine Route.

When it comes to Burgundian wine which is your most memorable experience?
– Easy.  A 1983 Ramonet La Montrachet.  It was such an incredible experience, this single bottle of wine warranted an entire chapter in my book.  We called it (the wine, that is) "God in a Bottle" – for no mere human could combine all of the necessary factors of grape, terroir, weather, wine-making skill and good fortune that would produce such a wonder.

In your opinion which is the most overlooked part of Burgundy?
– The genuine warmth and friendship that one can find in the small villages - especially those of the Hautes Cotes, Maconnais, etc where tourists are less frequent.  Too many visitors spend too much time in Dijon, Chalon or even in Beaune, to the exclusion of the smaller villages. Don't get me wrong, Dijon and Beaune are wonderful, but to discover the real essence of Burgundy, you have to get to where life is about the simple pleasures - like making new friends, or sharing a bottle of wine and some fromage...

Speaking of food, what is not to be missed when visiting Burgundy?
– Oeufs meurette.  It is not something that, when described, may sound particularly appealing - especially to American or English palates.  My first taste was under duress - but only the first bite.  Now, it's a love affair - one of the truly simple, yet marvelously delicious creations, of Burgundian cuisine.

Nicole de Merteuil – Hôtel Bergerand's

Nicole de Merteuil, Hôtel Bergerand's, Chablis

When it comes to Burgundian wine which is your most memorable experience?
– To take a university course at UCLA in California about wine discovery... I didn't know anything about wine, didn't know the difference between Burgundian wine and one from the Bordeaux region... The first thing I learned was how to regognize at first sight a Burgundy from a Bordeaux... It was the distinctive shape of the bottle! Today some twenty years later I live in Burgundy, in Chablis and my life is completely different, I run a bed & breakfast and I hold a wine bar and animate a wine tasting club in Chablis called Sarah's Vineyards. My life is great here...ilovechablis! - the wine, the people and the region.

In your opinion which is the most overlooked part of Burgundy?
– The department of Yonne (89), the northern part of Burgundy. The visitors and the tourists just make one day stop in the region to buy chablis and continue their route to Beaune... That is why I am trying to promote this region with my website and a tour called "72h dans l'Yonne".

Speaking of food, what is not to missed when visiting Burgundy?
– The Jambon au Chablis, which was created by chef Charles Bergerand, the founder of the hôtel I run. I also very much like les oeufs en meurette and the gougères.

Fabienne Gaillard-Nicot - Domaine Ballorin & F

Fabienne Gaillard-Nicot, Domaine Ballorin & F, Morey-Saint-Denis

When it comes to Burgundian wine which is your most memorable experience?

– 1992 Montrachet – Domaine Jacques Prieur

In your opinion which is the most overlooked part of Burgundy?

– The Marsannay area and the region of St Romain, Auxey-Duresses and Saint Aubin.

Speaking of food, what is not to missed when visiting Burgundy?

– Jambon persillé